Morrison's Pensions


Joseph French
S9900

State of New York
County of Herkimer
On this sixth day of October in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty four, personally applied in open court before the Court of Common Pleas in and for the County of Herkimer, now sitting Joseph French a resident of the Town of Frankfort in the County of Herkimer and State of New York aged seventy four years and ten days who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7, 1832.

That he was born at Phillips Patent in the County of Dutchess in the State of New York on the twenty-sixth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty.

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated.

That the first town he served he enlisted at a place called New Britain five miles from the Village of Kinderhook in the Town of Kinderhook in the County of Columbia in the State of New York, he then being a resident of New Britain aforesaid in the said County of Columbia and State of New York on the fourteenth day of February in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy six for ten months in the Line of the State of New York, in the Regiment commanded by Colonel Goose Van Schaick and in a company belonging to said regiment commanded by Captain David Van Ness, the name of the Lieutenant of said company was Van Ness, was a brother of the aforesaid Captain Van Ness; but the given name of said Lieutenant declarant has forgotten, that the name of the ensign of said company was Truesdale but that he did not for some cause unknown to deponent go out with said company. That Peter Gansevoort was the Lieutenant colonel of said regiment and Jellis Fonda the Adjutant. That Andrew Fink and a Wm Wright were Captains in said regiment. That he does not remember the names of any of the other of officers of said regiment save those he has stated.

That two weeks after he enlisted, it being the last of February or first of March he marched to the City of Albany in the County of Albany and State of New York aforesaid in the company of the said Captain David Van Ness under whom he enlisted where they were armed and equipped and when the several companies of the said regiment rendezvoused. That part of said regiment immediately thereafter were marched northly through Halfmoon, Saratoga and Fort Edward to Fort George at the head of Lake George from whence they proceeded by water down Lake George to its outlet and thence by land to Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain where they remained for or five weeks.

That from Ticonderoga they proceeded down Lake Champlain to the Isle Aux Noix where they were met by the Northern American Army on its retreat from Canada. That said army was commanded by General Sullivan. That eight or ten days after their meeting the American Army, they came up Lake Champlain with said army to the Isle Lamotte where they stopped eight or ten days; and that from thence they came up the said lake to Crown Point where they halted nine or ten days with said army. That from Crown Point they returned to Ticonderoga.

That from the latter place the troops belonging to the regiment of said Goose Van Schaick returned to the head of Lake George to Fort George whence they stayed till the latter part of November in the same year.

That they then were marched from Fort George by Fort Edward to the Saratoga barracks on the west side of the Hudson where they encamped till the latter part of December when they were marched to the City of Albany aforesaid, where they arrived the last day of December in the same year; and that he was honorably discharged on the first day of January in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy seven having fully served out thee ten months for which he had enlisted. That that part of the regiment which marched to the north as aforesaid and to which he was attached consisted of only three or four companies and was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Peter Gansevoort from the time it left the City of Albany as aforesaid till it returned to said city as aforesaid.

That he has no written or documentary evidence of his said services and discharge none having been given to him at the time of his aforesaid discharge.

That the second term he served the militia regiment to which he belonged was ordered out in mass the last day of May or the first of June in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy seven to aid in stopping the progress of General Burgoyne. That the said regiment was commanded by Colonel Vischer, that he belonged to the company in said regiment commanded by Captain Yeomans. That the lieutenant or ensign of said company was a Wm. Hubbs. That one of the companies of said regiment was under the command of Captain Bennet. That at the time the said regiment was ordered out he was a resident of Warren’s Bush then in the County of Tryon in the State of New York, but now in the Town of Florida in the County of Montgomery in said state.

That as soon as the men of said regiment were assembled they marched to Schenectady in the then County of Albany and thence through Niskeuna, Halfmoon, Stillwater and Saratoga to Fort Edward on the east side of the Hudson where they joined the Northern army under General Schuyler and remained there until the said army retreated down the river to Fort Miller on the west side of the Hudson. That he was in the rear guard consisting of about six hundred men commanded by General Arnold. That the enemy’s advance guard was close by when they left Fort Edward and harassed them in their retreat. That there was one skirmish between the rear guard of the American Army to which he belonged and the advance guard of General Burgoyne’s Army. That they left Fort Miller after General Burgoyne had reached Fort Edward with the main British Army and retreated to Saratoga where they halted three or four days. That the American Army then retreated to Stillwater where they halted a week or eight days.

That he was honorably discharged about the first of August in the same year and then returned home having served in this tour two months. That he has no documentary evidence of his second tour of service none having been given to him. That he does not know of any officer or soldier or person now living whose testimony he can procure who can testify to the latter tour of service.

That after having been at home a week he entered the service a third time it being near the middle of August 1777 as a substitute for his brother John French who had enlisted in the New York Line as a teamster and had then four months to serve to make out the period of his enlistment. That the occasion of his entering the service as a substitute was that he brother John French was taken unwell and was unable to perform his term of service.

That the company of the teamsters in which he served said four months was commanded by Captain Beebee. That at the time he entered the service as such substitute he was a resident of Warren’s Bush in the aforesaid County of Tryon. That he joined said company of Teamsters at Van Schaick’s Island in the Hudson at the mouth of the Mohawk near Halfmoon aforesaid.

That the American Army soon after he joined it advanced up the Hudson to Bemis’s Heights where it took a position and awaited the Army of Burgoyne. That he teamed from Van Schaidk’s Island and Halfmoon aforesaid to Bemis’s Heights. That he went frequently to Halfmoon for military stores and provisions and other supplies for the American Army and as often as from once to twice a week till after the Surrender of Burgoyne’s Army.

That he was at Saratoga when both battles were fought between the American Army under General Gates and the British under General Burgoyne and also when the Army of General Burgoyne surrendered. That near the middle of December in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy seven he was honorably discharged at the City of Albany aforesaid after having served four months as a substitute as aforesaid it being the whole of the residue of the time his brother John French had to serve when taken unwell as aforesaid. That he has no documentary evidence of his third term of service none having been given to him.

That the fourth term he served he was called out on an alarm in the early part of October in the year 1778 to Stone Arabia in the Town of Palatine in the then County of Tryon but now in the County of Montgomery in the aforesaid State of New York, he then being a resident of Warren’s Bush aforesaid in the said County of Tryon. That he then belonged to the Militia Company commanded by Captain Yeomans. That he went with the said Captain Yeomans to Stone Arabia and from Stone Arabia aforesaid to guard several boats carrying supplies up the Mohawk River to the garrison at Fort Stanwix now Rome in the County of Oneida. That they marched from Stone Arabia aforesaid down to the Mohawk River and thence up the said river, marching along in view of said boats to Fort Stanwix aforesaid. That on returning from Fort Stanwix aforesaid he was honorably discharged having been out four weeks. That he has no documentary evidence of his said service and discharge, none having been given to him. That he knows of no persons whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his said tour of service.

That the fifth term he served in the Militia Regiment of the aforesaid Colonel Vischer, was called out by the said colonel about the middle of November in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy eight to go to Cherry Valley in the County of Tryon but now in the County of Otsego in the State of New York. That he was then a resident of Warren’s Bush aforesaid in the County of Tryon aforesaid. That the company in which he served was commanded by Captain Yeomans. That the occasion of the regiment being called out was the invasion of Cherry Valley by the Tories and Indians under Butler and Brandt. That before they reached Cherry Valley, the distance being nearly forty miles they had to march, the enemy had withdrawn after having laid the place waste and murdered a considerable number of the inhabitants. That he was out nine or ten days in this tour of service. That on his return he was honorably discharged but he has not any documentary evidence of his service and discharge, none having been given to him. That he knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his said tour of service.

That the sixth term he served the company of militia to which he belonged commanded by Captain Yeomans was ordered out in the early part of June in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy nine to Sacandaga in the aforesaid County of Tryon. That he was out with said company and aided in building a block house about two miles and a half from that river. That two other companies were out at the same time and aided in building said block house and doing other duties incidental to the service. That the three companies so out were commanded by a Captain Woodworth. That after having been out at Sacandaga aforesaid a month, he was marched to Johnstown in the said County of Tryon distant eighteen miles from Sacandaga aforesaid where he did garrison duty with the rest of Captain Yeomans company for one month at the Jail the same having been converted into a fort and enclosed with stockades. That while stationed at the aforesaid Jail, small scouting parties were sent out almost every day which were absent usually from one to two days. That he was out several times as a scout with these while at the latter place. That several companies were stationed at Johnstown aforesaid. That after having served two months he was honorably discharged and returned to Warren’s Bush aforesaid his place of residence of his aforesaid service and discharged none having been given to him at the time he was discharged. That he knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his last tour of service.

That his seventh tour in which he served he was drafted for four months the last of June or the first of July in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty, he then being a resident of Warren’s Bush aforesaid in the said County of Tryon and belonging to the Militia company of the aforesaid Captain Yeomans and the militia regiment of Colonel Vischer heretofore stated. That he and the other drafts were formed into a company and placed under the command of Captain Lansing and marched from the aforesaid County of Tryon to the City of Albany in the County of Albany where they were joined to another company of drafts. That both companies were embarked on board of watercrafts at Albany and proceeded down the Hudson to West Point in the State of New York where they joined the American Army encamped at that place and its vicinity. That the said companies were embodied with a regiment of drafts then at West Point aforesaid. That after being so embodied the said regiment went down the river Hudson to Dobb’s Ferry about twenty miles northerly of the City of New York whence they joined some Continental troops and encamped with them.

That between three and four weeks thereafter they were marched northerly to Stoney Point on the west side of the Hudson and not long afterwards the company to which he belonged and the other company which had accompanied them from Albany aforesaid embarked on board of vessels and returned to Albany aforesaid. That the next day as declarent thinks and believes after their arrival at Albany they were marched by Captain Lansing to the Middle Fort at Schoharie, thirty miles westerly of Albany aforesaid where said company was joined to the garrison at said fort. That at this time there were but three forts at Schoharie namely the Upper, Middle and Lower Forts. That he did garrison duty in the Middle Fort till after the twentieth of October in the same year. That while stationed there Schoharie was laid waste by the British, Tories and Indians under the command of Sir John Johnson. That the enemy attacked the Middle Fort in which he was stationed by were repulsed by the garrison. That the troops stationed at the Middle Fort were commanded by Major Wolsey and that Jellis Fonda already mentioned as Adjutant was also there. That Sir John Johnson marched from Schoharie northerly to the Mohawk in the aforesaid County of Tryon and thence up that river devastating the country in his march. That Captain Lansing with his company in conjunction with another company of drafts marched from Schoharie to the Mohawk in the aforesaid County of Tryon and there joined a large body of militia under the command of General Van Rensellaer. That the said company to which he belonged proceeded up the Mohawk to Fort Herkimer near the mouth of West Canada Creek in the then County of Tryon but now in the County of Herkimer where he was honorably discharged the last of October or the first of November after having fully served out the four months for which he had been drafted. That he has no documentary evidence of his services and discharge, none having been given to him.

That the eighth time he remembers to have served the militia regiment of the aforesaid Colonel Vischer were ordered out in July in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty one to Turlough now Sharon in the County of Schoharie in order to repress the enemy who had invaded that section of country. That he belonged to a company of militia in said regiment commanded by the aforesaid Captain Yeomans and was a resident of Warren’s Bush aforesaid in the aforesaid County of Tryon. That they had to march about thirty miles. That there was a battle with the enemy at Turlough aforesaid in which the enemy were defeated but that he was not in said battle the company of Captain Yeomans to which he belonged not being able to arrive in time. That some of the companies of Colonel Vischer’s regiment were in said battle and others not. That the Americans were commanded by Colonel Willett. That a Major named McKean on the side of the Americans was mortally wounded and died next day. That he was out in this tour of service two weeks and was then honorably discharged but that he has no documentary evidence of his services and discharge,, none having been given to him. That he knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his said service.

That the ninth tour he remembers to have served was in October in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty one but the particular time he does not remember thought he was ordered out immediately before the Battle of Johnstown in the aforesaid County of Tryon, fought between the Americans under Colonel Willett and the British Tories and Indians under Major Ross. That he was not in said battle, the company he belonged to not having arrived till the next morning after the battle; he however assisted in burying the dead. The company of militia he served in was commanded by Captain Yeomans already named. That he remembers there was a Major under Colonel Willett called Riley. That at the time he was ordered out he was a resident of Warren’s Bush aforesaid in the aforesaid County of Tryon. That he was out in this tour two weeks and was then honorably discharged. That he has no documentary evidence of his services and discharge, none having been given to him, that he knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his said service.

That the tenth time which he now remembers to have been out he was ordered out in the fore part of June in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty two. That the whole regiment was not ordered out the party amounting to only about one hundred and fifty men drawn partly from Colonel Vischer’s regiment to which he belonged and other regiments. That they were under the command of Captain Andrew Fink and that they marched from the aforesaid County of Tryon to Fort Edward on the Hudson proceeding on their march through Schenectady Niskauna, Halfmoon and Saratoga; and that they marched from Fort Edward through the woods to Jessup’s Patent westerly of Lake George in the present County of Warren in the State of New York and then returned to Fort Edward aforesaid where he was honorably discharged. That he returned home after his discharge to Warren’s Bush aforesaid he residence. That he was out five weeks on this tour of service and marched nearly or quite, two hundred and fifty miles computing his egness? and regnes?s from and to Warren’s Bush aforesaid. That he has no documentary evidence of his said tour of service none having been given to him at the time he was discharge. That he knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his said service.

That when he enlisted in February in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy six at New Britain five miles from the Village of Kinderhook in the Town of Kinderhook in the then County of Albany in the said State of new York but now in the County of Columbia in said state he and his father were then residents of that place. That in February in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy seven he removed with his father from New Britain aforesaid in the Town of Kinderhook aforesaid to Warren’s Bush in the then County of Tryon but now the Town of Florida in the County of Montgomery and State of New York where he resided during the rest of the Revolutionary War save the times he was in the service and after the said war and till the month of January in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety five when he removed from Warren’s Bush aforesaid now Florida as aforesaid to the Town of Schuyler in the County of Herkimer aforesaid till the early part of January in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirteen when he removed into the Town of Frankfort aforesaid in the aforesaid County of Herkimer where he has resided ever since and where he now resides.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

(Signed) Joseph French

Letter included in the Pension Application Folder

February 5, 1935.
Mr. Roger F. Williams
Antwerp, New York

Dear Sir:
The data contained herein are obtained from the papers on file in the Revolutionary War claim S.9900, based upon the military service of Joseph French in that war.

Joseph French, son of Ebenezer French, was born September 26, 1760 in the Phillips Patent, Dutchess County, New York. No reference is made to his mother.

While residing with his father in New Britain, New York, he enlisted February 14, 1778, served as private and drummer in Captain David Van Ness’ Company, Colonel Goose Van Schaick’s New York Regiment; was in the attack upon Canada and discharged January 1, 1777. In February 1777, he moved with his father to Warren’s Bush later called Florida, New York, and while living there he enlisted about the first of June 1777, served two months in Captain Yeomans’ Company, Colonel Fisher’s New York Regiment and was in a skirmish. He enlisted about the middle of August 1777, served as substitute for his oldest brother, John French, who was taken sick while serving an enlistment of nine months, in Captain Roderick Beebe’s Company of Teamsters, Colonel Hay’s New York Regiment; length of service, four months. He enlisted the first part of October 1778 and served four weeks in Captain Yeomans’ New York Company. He enlisted about the middle of November 1778 and served nine or ten days in Captain Yeomans’ Company, Colonel Fisher’s New York Regiment. He enlisted the first part of June 1778 and served two months in Captains Yeomans’ and Woodworth’s New York Companies. He enlisted about the first of July 1780, served in Captain Lansing’s New York Company; also did garrison duty at Fort Schoharie under Major Woolsey; was in the battle of Schoharie and discharged about the first of November 1780. he enlisted in July 1781 and served two weeks in Captain Yeomans’ Company, Colonel Fischer’s New York Regiment. He enlisted in October 1781 and served two weeks in Captain Yeomans’ New York Company. He enlisted the first part of June 1783 and served five weeks in Captain Andrew Finck’s New York Company.

In January 1795 he moved from Warren’s Bush, New York to Schuyler, Herkimer County, New York, and the first part of January 1814 he moved to Frankfort, Herkimer County, New York.

He was allowed pension on his application executed October 6, 1834 while a resident of Frankfort, New York.

Soldier died June 11, 1844, place not stated.

In 1834 Samuel French, aged seventy-six years, a brother of the soldier was residing in Amsterdam, Montgomery County, New York.

In 1835 it was stated that the soldier’s brother John French had been dead many years.

In 1834 one Jairus French was a Justice of the Peace of Madison County, New York, no relationship to soldier stated. There are no further family data.

Very truly yours,
A.D. Hiller
Executive Assistant to the Administrator.

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