Morrison's Pensions


Pension Application for John Shaul or Shull, Schall

W.11441 (Widow: Elizabeth)
State of New York
Herkimer County SS.
            On this seventh day of October 1844, personally appeared before the Court of common Pleas of the said County in open court before the Judges thereof (the same being a court of record) Elizabeth Shaul a resident of the town of Stark in the said County of Herkimer aged Eighty-three years the twenty fifth day of December next who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed July 7th, 1838, Entitled “An act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows”, and the subsequent acts and Resolutions of Congress explanatory of the said act and extending pensions to certain widows.—That she is the widow of John Shaul who was a private in the Revolutionary Army.  That her husband the said John Shaul in his lifetime received a pension under the Act of Congress passed June 7, 1832 at the rate of forty three dollars & thirty three cents per annum and she further declares that she was married to the said John Shaul on the Eleventh day of October in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty four.  That her maiden name was Elizabeth Bronner—That her husband the aforesaid John Shaul died on the eighth day of June in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty four.  That she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service but the marriage took place previous to the first day of January seventeen hundred and ninety four viz at the time above stated that the marriage was solemnized by the Revd Abraham Rosencrantz.  (Signed with her mark)  Elizabeth Shaul
            Sworn in open Court the day & year first above written—E. A. Munson, Clerk
State of New York
County of Herkimer SS.
            On this ninth day of October 1832 personally appeared in open court before the Court of Common Pleas in & for the County of Herkimer now sitting John Shaul a resident of the town of Stark in the County of Herkimer and State of New York aged seventy two years who being first duly sworn according to the law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.
            That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated.
            That at the commencement of the Revolutionary War he resided at a Settlement called the Osquago about ten miles south of the Mohawk river—where he was enrolled at the age of sixteen in a company of militia commanded by Captain Henry Eckler in a regiment commanded by Col. Bellinger.  That in the Spring of 1776 he was called out with the militia to a Small fort at German flatts on the Mohawk river.  That he does not remember the name of the officer who commanded at the fort at that time.  That he remained at the Fort under arms doing duty as a Soldier about a week.  That the next time he was called out was at the time of the Oriskany battle when he marched for Oriskany near fort Stanwix and on his way was left by the Commanding officer at the Fort at German flatts to Guard the fort—That Butler was taken as prisoner after they [?] (who was afterwards shot by the American Indians at West Canada Creek).  Was there a prisoner at that fort and this applicant was placed as a centinal at the door of the room where he was confined.  That he remained here until the return of the militia after the battle of Oriskany and then returned home with them.  That he supposes he was out this time about a week.  That after the Oriskany battle their settlements being constantly threatened by the hostile Savages—they were obliged to abandon them and they accordingly removed to Fort Plank in 1778 on the Mohawk river distant about ten miles from this deponents residence on the Osquago.  That he was here constantly in readiness for service and was occasionally employed as Centinal at the fort and occasionally employed on Scouting excursions but cannot particularize them.  That he was here enrolled in Captain Countryman’s company of Militia—That he was ordered out at the Surrender of Burgoyne went as far as Schenectady and hearing of his surrender returned and he remembers of being out at the time the settlement of Cherry Valley was burnt went out marched in Captains Bigbread or Captain Countryman’s Company.  That on leaving their settlement at Osquago they left some crops of grain on the ground which in the course of the summer and fall they harvested, being under the necessity of carrying their arms with them into the field and keeping a diligent watch against the Savages & tories.  That in the ensuing December (1778) there was snow on the ground knee deep, he and his two Brothers went out to the Settlement at Osquago to thrash some peas there—that he had his arms with him—That they were surprised by a party of Indians seven in number headed by the celebrated Joseph Brant—and all three of them were taken prisoners—That he was taken by them immediately to the head of Seneca lake nearly two hundred miles, that one of his Brothers, was left with the Indians at Cayuga on the way—and the other taken immediately to Fort Niagara—That this applicant was detained by the Indians as their prisoner from that time during the whole war and was delivered up by them at the Close of the war in the year 1783 to the British Garrison at Fort Niagara and transport by way of Montreal to Fort Edward where he was delivered to the American Garrison and discharged.  That he remained a prisoner about four years and nine months & That they never would consent to let him go and said they would rather kill him than let him go that he was obliged to run away from them at the time he did go & went to fort Niagara--they followed him & finding that he would not go back with them they then delivered him up to Col. Johnson and received their bounty of twenty dollars for him—That at the same time when he was taken prisoner the Indians set fire to the house and barn where they were and they were entirely consumed.  There was no other person than the three above mentioned at the settlement at the time—That the Indians took with them four horses and some bedding that the three brothers were then using.  That he was constantly from the Spring of 1776 until he was taken prisoner enrolled and performed the duty of a militia soldier either in Capt. Eckler’s or in Capt. Countryman’s company.  That he has no documentary evidence of his services, nor has he ever had any.
            That in answer to the interrogatories put by the Court he states:
            1st. That he was born in the now town of Minden in the County of Montgomery and State of New York.
            2d. My father put down our ages in Bible & I have an Extract from it made about twenty six years—Born Aug. 18, 1780.
            3d. That when first called into actual service he lived at a Settlement called the Osquago within the now town of Stark in the said County of Herkimer, that he resided there until driven from the settlement—by the Indians in the year 1777.  That from that time during the war he resided at Fort Plank on the Mohawk excepting the time he was a prisoner with the Indians as before stated; and on his return from captivity he again took up his residence at the first mentioned Settlement where he has ever since resided and still resides.  No discharges or documentary evidence of services--:
            4th. That his services performed previous to his having been taken prisoner were performed as a volunteer or when in company he belonged to was ordered out—
            5th .He does not remember any regular officers who—were with the troops where he served.
            6th. He never received a written discharge for any of his services.
            7th. As to persons to whom he is known in his neighborhood and who can testify to his character for veracity and their belief of his services in the revolution he refers to John Lawin and Jacob J. Youngs
            He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in any state. 
            Sworn to and subscribed the day and hear aforesaid.  (Signed with his mark)  John Shall
            We John Lawin a clergyman residing in the town of Springfield in the county of Otsego and State of New York and Christopher Norton residing in the town of Stark in the County of Herkimer and State aforesaid hereby certify that we are well acquainted with John Shall who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration that we believe him to be Seventy two years of age.  That he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution, and there we concur in that opinion.  (Signed)  John Lawin,  (Signed with his mark).  Christopher Norton
            Sworn and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.
State of New York
County of Otsego.  SS.
            Henry Shaul a resident of the town of Stark in the County of Herkimer and State aforesaid, being duly sworn saith that John Shaul whose papers are hereto annexed is the brother of this deponent.  That this deponent is seventy four years of age.  That he resided with the said John Shaul at the Osquago at the commencement of the Revolutionary War as described by him in his declaration.  That he was called out and served in the militia under Capt. Henry Eckler, to whose company they both belonged, Several times.  That in the year 1777 they were together when they were called out to the alarm at Oriskany.  That on their way the said John Shaul was left at the Fort at German flatts where he remained as a centinel as he states until they returned from the battle and then they all returned home together.
            That he remembers being called out with him the year before when they lay under arms at the Fort at German flatts about one week.
            That he was also with him at the time when he went as far as Schenectady on his way to meet Burgoine.  That they were on their march to Saratoga and while on their way at Schenectady and express arrived bringing the intelligence that Burgoine had surrendered and they returned.  When these services were performed before they removed from their Settlement at the Osquago.  But in the spring of 1778 they removed from there to Fort Plank on the Mohawk river.
            That in the fall of this year he was called out with the said John Shaul to Cherry Valley at the time that place was burnt off and knows of his being [?] as a soldier.  That from the time of the removing to the fort in the Spring, to the month of November when the said John was taken by the Indians, they constantly lay at the fort, when not out on duty.  That the few militia then at the fort were under the necessity of staying at the fort as the only garrison to protect the families that had removed there for safety and they were both enrolled in Capt. Countryman’s company of Militia.  That Capt. Copeman & Maj. House commanded for the most part at the fort.  That at the time and said John and his two brothers Sebastian and Mattice were taken prisoners by the Indians this deponent was absent on duty as a soldier at Cherry Valley.  That he will remembers the time and thinks it was in the month of November 1778.  He also remembers that there was snow on the ground at the time.  That his two brothers John Shaul and Sebastian remained away nearly five years, but his brother—Mattice who was taken with them returned in about a year after they were taken.   And further saith not.  (Signed with his mark)  Henry Shaul.
            Sworn and subscribed this 11th day of Aug. 1832 before me.  Aaron Havns, Justice of the Peace.
State of New York
County of Otsego SS.
            Sebastian Shaul a resident of Stark in the County of Herkimer, and State of New York, being duly sworn saith that he is sixty six years of age.  That he is a brother of John Shaul whose papers are hereto annexed.  That he was with the said John Shaul and taken prisoner with him by the Indians at Osquago in the month of November 1778 as set forth by him in his declaration.  That they were surprised while in the house at Osquago by a party of seven Indians headed by Joseph Brant and Indian Chief.  That the three brothers were alone and had but one gun with them and resistance was useless.  That they took the horses and their bedding and then set fire to the house and barn.  That they burnt off the whole settlement at the same time and also the Settlement at the Kyle.  That this deponent was taken by then to Fort Niagara and then detained there until the close of the war.  That his brother Mattice was left at Cauyga Lake and his brother John at Seneca Lake.  That he saw his brother John about a year after they left him, that he came to Niagara with the Indians.  That after that time he saw him frequently in the course of the war with the Indians.  And at the close of the war they came home together as he described having both been detained as prisoners nearly five years.  That he was only twelve years of age when he was taken prisoner & was not out on duty with his brothers previous to that time, and therefore does not know or remember anything about his service.  And further saith not.  (Signed with his mark)  Sebastian Shaul.
            Sworn & Subscribed this 11th day of Aug. 1832 before me. [?] Havns, Justice of the Peace.

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